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CogMed

Frequently Asked Questions

How is Cogmed different?

Many products are marketed aggressively to people who struggle with attention, but Cogmed’s solutions stand out as it is fundamental cognitive training, not skills learning.

Cogmed does not teach you new skills. We help you create a platform for learning skills. The concept of neuroplasticity, the idea that the brain can reorganize itself and change, is what allows Cogmed to effectively change the way the brain functions to perform at its maximum capacity. There are many training programs for various skills such as reading, math, or time management. Cogmed acts on a different, more fundamental level. Once your working memory has improved, you will find that acquiring new skills is suddenly much more doable for you.

Focused solution, substantial benefits: Cogmed is not a one-size-fits-all answer. Cogmed is a solution that improves working memory allowing you to focus and resist distractions better. This will help you academically, socially, and professionally. Other companies make wide claims, but are vague about the specifics of what is being improved. Cogmed’s approach is specific and effective.

Solid research: Cogmed is based on peer-reviewed, published research by leading scientists. No other attention training products can match the research case behind Cogmed.

Professional service: When you decide to invest in Cogmed training, a Cogmed-trained coach will support you throughout your training. This is not a product – it is a high quality service. You will be helped to get the most out of your effort.

How is Cogmed different from other cognitive training programs?

1. Cogmed Working Memory Training was developed by a world-renowned neuroscientist.
Our program was developed by Dr. Torkel Klingberg, a neuroscientist at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden who has received wide spread recognition for his work. You can learn about Dr. Klingberg and his work by visiting his lab web site at www.klingberglab.se. Dr. Klingberg remains actively involved with Cogmed helping us to further refine and develop the program and conducting ongoing research on its impact.

2. Cogmed Working Memory Training is supported by more published research than any other cognitive training program.
No other cognitive training program has the level of research support that backs Cogmed Working Memory Training. Research supporting Cogmed’s program has been published in the world’s leading scientific journals after undergoing a rigorous peer-review process. Published studies include several randomized, placebo-controlled trials, a type of study considered the gold standard for evaluating treatment effectiveness. Independent research groups that have no affiliation to Cogmed have also demonstrated the value of Cogmed’s program. No other program can make this claim.

3. Cogmed Working Memory Training is only provided through a network of highly experienced physicians and psychologists.
The physicians and psychologists we select to offer our program are highly experienced in assisting children and adults with attention and working memory challenge. These highly experienced clinicians can identify when Cogmed Working Memory Training is an appropriate treatment option and provide a full range of evaluation and treatment services when it is not. Many of our partner clinicians are leaders in their community for the treatment of ADHD and learning problems. Several have been elected to the CHADD Hall of Fame. CHADD is the national support organization for children and adults with ADHD and recognize scientists and clinicians whose contribution to the ADHD field warrants this honor.

4. Cogmed Working Memory Training is the only cognitive training program to focus exclusively on training working memory, a critically important cognitive function.
Working memory is our ability to hold information in mind and to use that information in our thinking to perform tasks. It is essential for attention and focus and plays a critical role in children’s academic achievement. Rather than training a wide array of abilities, the entire Cogmed program is focused on training this critical cognitive function. As noted above, the existing research indicates that this intensive focus is associated with meaningful improvements.

5. Cogmed does not make extravagant claims.
You will never hear Cogmed making claims about curing ADHD or eliminating working memory problems. You will not hear us say that it works for everyone because it does not. The claims we make are ones that are supported by the published research and by the results obtained by professionals around the world who use our program. Based on this research and experience, we can confidently state that approximately 80% of individuals with attention and working memory problems who complete Cogmed training will experience meaningful benefits

Cogmed Case Study

 

Cogmed Success Rates

 

The below table includes studies that validate the Cogmed Working Memory Training program and that have appeared in peer-reviewed, scientific journals.

Year Publication Title Author Abstract
2013 Pediatrics Working memory training improves cognitive function in VLBW preschoolers Grunewaldt et al. Link to abstract
2013 Memory & Cognition Exploration of an adaptive training regimen that can target the secondary memory component of working memory capacity Gibson et al. In Press
2012 Psycho-Oncology Working memory training in survivors of pediatric cancer: A randomized pilot study Hardy et al. Link to abstract
2012 Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry Effects of a computerized working memory training program on working memory, attention, and academics in adolescents with severe LD and comorbid ADHD; a randomized controlled trial Gray et al. Link to abstract
2012 Frontiers in Human Neuroscience Computerized training of non-verbal reasoning and working memory in children with intellectual disability Söderqvist et al. Link to abstract
2012 Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition Component analysis of simple span vs. complex span adaptive working memory exercises: A randomized controlled trial Gibson et al. Link to abstract
2012 Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy Working memory training for patients with acquired brain injury: effects in daily life Johansson & Tornmalm Link to abstract
2012 Frontiers in Human Neuroscience Working-memory training in younger and older adults: Training gains, transfer and maintenance Brehmer et al. Link to abstract
2012 Neurotherapeutics Will working memory training generalize to improve off-task behavior in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder? Green et al. Link to abstract
2011 NeuroImage Neural correlates of training-related working-memory gains in old age Brehmer et al. Link to abstract
2011 Science Interventions shown to aid executive function development in children 4 to 12 years old Diamond & Lee Link to abstract
2011 Neuropsychologia Preliminary evidence that allelic variation in the LMX1A gene influences training related working memory improvement Bellander et al. Link to abstract
2011 Learning and Individual Differences The impact of working memory training in young people with social, emotional and behavioral difficulties Roughan & Hadwin Link to abstract
2011 Developmental Science Gains in fluid intelligence after training non-verbal reasoning in 4-year-old children: A controlled randomized study Bergman Nutley et al. Link to abstract
2011 Child Neuropsychology Component analysis of verbal versus spatial working memory training in adolescents with ADHD: A randomized, controlled trial Gibson et al. Link to abstract
2011 Developmental Psychology Dopamine, working memory, and training induced plasticity: Implications for developmental research Söderqvist et al. Link to abstract
2011 Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research Working memory training for children with cochlear implants: A pilot study Kronenberger et al. Link to abstract
2010 The Journal of Pediatrics Computerized working memory training improves function in adolescents born at extremely low birth weight Løhaugen et al. Link to abstract
2010 Trends in Cognitive Sciences Training and plasticity of working memory Klingberg et al. Link to abstract
2010 Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology A controlled trial of working memory training for children and adolescents with ADHD Beck et al. Link to abstract
2010 Advances in Child Development and Behavior, Vol. 39 Poor working memory: Impact and interventions Holmes et al. Link to abstract
2010 School Mental Health Working memory training for children with attention problems Mezzacappa et al. Link to abstract
2010 Reading and Writing Effects of working memory training on reading in children with special needs Dahlin Link to abstract
2010 Applied Cognitive Psychology Impacts of training and medication on working memory on ADHD Children Holmes et al. Link to abstract
2010 Brain Injury Computerized training of working memory in a group of patients suffering from acquired brain injury Lundqvist et al. Link to abstract
2009 Developmental Science Training leads to sustained enhancement of poor working memory in children Holmes et al. Link to abstract
2009 Neuroscience Letters Working memory plasticity modulated by dopamine transporter genotype Brehmer et al. Link to abstract
2009 Science Changes in cortical D1 receptor binding after cognitive training McNab et al. Link to abstract
2009 Developmental Science Training and transfer effects of executive functions in preschoolers Thorell et al. Link to abstract
2007 Physiology and Behavior Changes in cortical activity after training of working memory – a single-subject analysis Westerberg & Klingberg Link to abstract
2007 Brain Injury Computerized working memory training after stroke – a pilot study Westerberg et al. Link to abstract
2005 JAACAP Computerized training of working memory of children with ADHD Klingberg et al. Link to abstract
2004 Nature Neuroscience Increased prefrontal and parietal activity after training of working memory Olesen et al. Link to abstract
2002 J. of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology Training of working memory in children with ADHD Klingberg et al. Link to abstract

ADHD ADD Attention Deficit Disorder Treatment & Testing for Adults and Children in Edmonton, Alberta using Neurofeedback and other Brain-Based Approaches

Below are a sample of published studies that are especially relevant in demonstrating the relationship between working memory and ADHD. All of the studies have been published in top quality scientific journals.

Year Publication Title Author Abstract
1997 Psychological Bulletin Behavioral inhibition, sustained attention, and executive functions: Constructing a unifying theory of ADHD. Barkley Link to abstract
2002 Nature Neuroscience Neuroscience of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: the search for endophenotypes Castellanos et al. Link to abstract
2005 Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry A meta-analysis of working memory impairments in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Martinussen et al. Link to abstract
2008 Journal of Abnormal Psychology Cognitive inhibition and working memory in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Engelhardt et al. Link to abstract
2009 Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology Hyperactivity in boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): A ubiquitous core symptom or manifestation of working memory deficits? Rapport et al. Link to abstract
2010 Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology Competing core processes in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): Do working memory deficiencies underlie behavioral inhibition deficits? Alderson et al. Link to abstract
2010 Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology ADHD and working memory: The impact of central executive deficits and exceeding storage/rehearsal capacity on observed inattentive behavior. Kofler et al. Link to abstract
2010 Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology Working memory demands impair skill acquisition in children with ADHD. Huang-Pollock et al. Link to abstract

 

Additional Resources

Behavioral Treatment for ADHD/ADD: A General OverviewI think most parents are aware of the medication options for treating ADHD, but I don’t think as many realize how big a role behavioral treatment plays in an ADHD care plan.


Child Safety Guide: How to Keep Kids Safe When They’re Home AloneKids with ADHD will inevitably be left home alone at one point or another. It’s important to take extra precautions to make sure they’re set up for safety.


Activities for Children with ADHD –Not all activities are a good fit for a kid with ADHD, but it’s good to know there are plenty of options that are.


The Top 3 Challenges to Finding a Babysitter for Your Special Needs Child – and How to Overcome ThemFortunately, we have a wonderful sitter who we’ve worked with for years, but I imagine this would be a huge source of stress for parents whose child tends to be a handful.


5 Ways to Support Siblings in Special Needs FamiliesI’m so glad I came across this article. It made me realize the importance of making sure all of our kids are adjusting to the changes we’ve made, and I think all parents whose child with ADHD has siblings should give this a read.